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15

The first problem that you write in UNIX style. But the UEFI uses DOS style. So your sequence of commands: map mount blk0 aaa aaa: // !!! change disk in dos stile cd EFI\debian // use backslashes grubx64.efi // run bootloader without "./" The second problem - you have nothing written about the disk partitioning system. You can`t use ...


14

Fantastic. I had this problem with a Fedora 22 Live image on an USB stick created as per UEFI boot of USB sticks using livecd-iso-to-disk --efi --format --reset-mbr Fedora-Live-Xfce-x86_64-22-3.iso /dev/sdX Which gives a bootable GPT-organized disk with a VFAT partition. Then I tried to myy a ZOTAC Nano CI320 using that stick and found myself in a EFI ...


14

A clean solution that doesn't leave any half baked open references like the sample from pk does is: $driveEject = New-Object -comObject Shell.Application $driveEject.Namespace(17).ParseName("E:").InvokeVerb("Eject") Retrieved from http://sushihangover.blogspot.nl/2012/02/powershell-eject-local-or-remote.html


13

There is a hardware limit of 96 endpoints on most Intel XHCI controllers. It wouldn't surprise me if each camera is using 8 endpoints, that's a pretty typical number for complex, modern devices. The hubs occupy endpoints as well. You can confirm this with USBView. This is a controller hardware limitation, and there's no way around it.


10

I was able to solve this by doing the following: Place the kickstart file at the top of the isolinux directory and make sure it is named ks.cfg my isolinux.cfg file looks like this: label linux menu label ^Install CentOS 7 kernel vmlinuz append initrd=initrd.img inst.ks=hd:LABEL=CentOS\x207\x20x86_64:/isolinux/ks.cfg inst.stage2=hd:LABEL=CentOS\x207\...


9

As has been mentioned in the comments, grab the disk's UUID and stick this in your fstab; UUID=66a7ba58-b1e2-4d91-9b5e-085064a954ab /stor ext4 defaults 0 0 (replace the UUID value with that of your own). As simple ls -la /dev/disk/by-uuid (which is just a collection of symlinks named the UUID of the disk which point to the real device's identifer (...


9

I don't know how the USB controller ended up disabled on your system... I'd love to know what happened right before you asked this question... But you do have a couple of options to recover. Since there's no PS/2 port on this line of servers, I guess keyboard input doesn't work. Is there an OS loaded already? Are you suuuure that your keyboard/KVM switch is ...


7

Install usbmount sudo apt-get install usbmount Allow users to access usb drives sudo sed -i 's/MOUNTOPTIONS="/MOUNTOPTIONS="user,umask=000,/' /etc/usbmount/usbmount.conf Plug in and use cd /media/usb touch beeblebrox You can get some More Details.


7

Reading regarding this on IBM support forums the suggestions to get it working are: Make sure you have latest Bios Ver. Make sure you have USB options selected in BIOS Insert USB and boot server Select F12 (Boot options) during boot up. USB will be displayed, select it and you will be prompted if you want to make it "Persistent" Boot. ...


7

USB data path is protected by checksums on the both sides. https://www.beyondlogic.org/usbnutshell/usb3.shtml (Watch out CRC field within USB data packet structure) This is the quote from the original USB specification: 8.3.5 Cyclic Redundancy Checks On the both ends of USB wire, hardwares (PIC USB peripheral and host controller on PC) check CRC to detect ...


6

Yes, this is documented on Wikipedia. Some advanced disk-drive commands, such as Native Command Queuing (which may increase performance), Secure Erase (which allows all data on the drive to be securely erased) and S.M.A.R.T. (accessing indicators of drive reliability) exist as extensions to low-level hard-drive command sets such as SCSI, SATA, or PATA. ...


5

I've tried everything, but only this seems to work: put the ks.cfg inside the initrd. So the steps below extract initrd, add the ks.cfg in there, and recreate it. Tested with CentOS7 First mount the original .iso image on your pc, and copy its contents under tmp/ Then, #Keep the original file cp -ai tmp/isolinux/initrd.img initrd.img.orig mkdir irmod cd ...


5

Bringing this back from the dead for completion. The details are fuzzy, but as it turns out the device itself was crashing on boot. I believe it had to do with uBoot generated chatter on the USB line. Essentially, uBoot polled all hardware lines (including USB) to find a bootable image. This polling should be harmless, but the firmware on our USB device ...


5

I've been researching the internet and since is hard to know if a device is vulnerable is better to be prepared at the other end of the USB socket and I found that actually there are some solutions: For Windows: There is a free program called G DATA USB Keyboard Guard which basically ask you to grant access when a new device is found: G DATA has ...


5

From my perspective, I think it's a single controller installed to the server. In order to get the confirmation, I would suggest you check the proper motherboard specifications.


4

Maybe the best thing to prevent hd sleep and firmware caching is the reading of a random sector of your disk: * * * * * bash -c 'dd if=/dev/sda of=/dev/null count=1 skip=$RANDOM' It worked just fine for me.


4

Surprisingly, this was not an easy problem to solve because a lot of PCIe USB 3.0 cards don't support Windows Server. The other problem I ran into is that the PCIe-based USB 3.0 cards require an auxiliary 5V power connection - typically provided by a 15-pin SATA power connector or a 4-pin Molex power connector - neither of which are available on a DL380 G7. ...


4

According to lsusb on an HP ProLiant DL380 G7, there are two PCI devices serving as USB controllers: # lspci | grep -i usb 00:1d.0 USB controller: Intel Corporation 82801JI (ICH10 Family) USB UHCI Controller #1 00:1d.1 USB controller: Intel Corporation 82801JI (ICH10 Family) USB UHCI Controller #2 00:1d.2 USB controller: Intel Corporation 82801JI (ICH10 ...


4

I know the question is from 2018, but a solution would be using bind-mounts and setting the "bind propagation" to "shared" (not available for volumes). Instead of: -v /media/<user>:/media/<user> Use: --mount type=bind,source=/media/<user>,target=/media/<user>,bind-propagation=shared More info about bind-propagation: https://docs....


3

Your server's booting to the image on the USB drive, but once it's booted to the image it's unable to mount the storage that it booted from; because of this, it's in stateless mode: no VIBs will stick and no configuration will stick because it cannot store them. Your BIOS knows how to work with your storage, but ESXi does not. I'd guess that ESXi doesn't ...


3

Can you give us more information on what you're trying to do? On your keyboard, does the caps-lock key work? Are you using a KVM switch at all, because weird things can happen? Also see: Is there a better workaround or solution to boot a Proliant DL380 Gen8 from USB DVD drive than "Restore Default System Settings"? Please use your ILO to check ...


3

Take a counter-example. We have some equipment that has a mini-USB serial port (or rather, a RS-232 signalling protocol carried over a Mini-USB socket/plug; thus not really USB per-se. This is a big pain in the proverbial, as trying to find a mini-USB adaptor was quite challenging (particularly on the local market). We ended up having to order the ...


3

There are probably some options for you, but nothing that's HP-supported (short of adding something like an HP D2600 JBOD enclosure) I'd suggest just buying a NAS or NAS enclosure to house your disks. You could try something that's USB-connected, but the range of devices and controllers supported by ESXi is small. A NAS is going to be safer, considering ...


3

What you need is to configure bridging. What bridging will do, is basically tie together a bunch of interfaces, and then letting the computer running the bridge act as a switch. The IP address is configured on the bridge interface itself, rather than on the constituent interfaces. There are basically two ways you can do this, either you set up a bridge with ...


3

I'd suggest using the ILO if possible. I'm glad you don't have a KVM in the mix. But are you CERTAIN that the keyboard doesn't work? I'm sure I've had situations where the mouse didn't work, but I could still navigate the installer interface using the keyboard (tab, space bar and Enter). Another thing you could try is bootstrapping your Windows ...


3

USB Vendor IDs are assigned by the USB Implementers Forum, the usb.ids file is just the way how your system knows about that. So if Intel has bought 3 vendor IDs (they are 5k$ a piece), it will appear 3 times there. Also, looking at the specific IDs 8086 and 8087, that looks as if intel tried to make sure nobody uses ID's which look like their ...


3

Enable the IOMMU option in the BIOS setup


3

Michael Hampton's advice is spot on and the Solaris man pages are quite good, but the concept is not that easy to grasp for a beginner. I will outline the points I've experienced when writing my scripts. Essentially, you first do a snapshot x and a full send/recv as usual: # Initial send, destroy all filesystems on the destination # pool which are not ...


3

This is not the way to accomplish VM backups in VMware. Mounting USB devices in ESXi will not do what you’re expecting.


3

You can obtain SMART attributes if the USB adapter/enclosure supports UASP, USB Attached SCSI Protocol. Older enclosures may not support this protocol and may only have proprietary interfaces to SMART, or none at all. The Linux smartctl command has some support for old proprietary USB enclosures, so you may get lucky. For all the gory details, see the ...


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