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8

VBoxManage internalcommands sethduuid "filename" "newUUID" Type VBoxManage internalcommands to see the other less documented features available.


6

Remove the shadow copies from the guest. That will do it! vssadmin delete shadows /all


6

This article explains how to do this. in short for windows 7/2008: go to computer management, click disk management, right click disk management, click create VHD, enter location. Select the disk, right click, initialize with MBR, right click "unallocated" string, click new simple volume, etc, map the drive letter. Then copy your files and folder to the ...


6

I couldn't find any easy way to do it; even the Disk Management console will not show you the physical path of the VHD when checking its properties. However, if you select the disk and click on "Detach VHD", you will at last be able to see it:


6

Virtual machine I/O isn't cached, it's very easy to check actually: run Process Manager which incapsulates old FileMon functionality and watch your .vhd(x) files access flags - should be FILE_FLAG_NO_BUFFERING raised and combined with a bunch of different "hint" flags. https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/downloads/procmon Inside the VM you can ...


5

RAID 6 or RAID 10. RAID 10 is a bit of a capacity waste, and RAID 6's random write penalty is completely hidden behind the write cache. I know you only think you'll need 4TB, but there's no reason to waste.


5

If you want to make sure the image has not been tampared with, just publish an MD5/SHA checksum, as many others do with such types of downloads. There is nothing built-in to hyper-v


5

The diskpart command can show the path of mounted VHDs. Run the following commands in a command prompt or PowerShell. diskpart list vdisk Example output: VDisk ### Disk ### State Type File --------- -------- -------------------- --------- ---- VDisk 0 Disk 2 Attached not open Expandable F:\Test.vhd


5

Correct me if I am wrong, the idea is to get data shared between guest cluster and also backup properly. If so, I would suggest to build a file server on top of iSCSI storage presented to guest cluster as CSV. For the case, storage would be shared between VMs as well as available for backup jobs using any kind of setup. HPE VSA, StarWind, UnityVSA are the ...


5

I would recommend trying RAM drive if you have enough free memory. For temporary data, this is the best option in my opinion. When it comes to a RAM drives the main drawback is the redundancy, however, you mentioned that it is possible to lose a VM thereby the main drawback become eliminated. For Windows https://www.starwindsoftware.com/high-performance-...


5

.ovf contains not only the virtual machine disks but also its metadata and configuration. That means there is no way to convert a .vhdx file (which is just a disk) into .ovf. In order to migrate to VMware from Hyper-V you have to use StarWind V2V Converter recoding your .vhdx files to .vmdk including hardware patching and probably enabling rescue mode (...


4

There are now several tools available to achieve this task. Some of theme have some more functions like converting a running PC to a image and converting to other formats. One neat little tool is StarWind V2V Converter: Another one is Vmdk2Vhd from vmToolkit but I have no experience with this one. If you want to go for the big solution with more functions ...


4

You can't run multiple copies of the same VM, but you can clone it and start up multiple individual machines. I'm going to assume this is straight Hyper-V without any SCVMM installed. So it's a two-step process. Right-click on the powered-off VM and choose "Export". Run through the export wizard. On the right-hand bar, click "Import VM". Make sure you ...


4

Nope. That's not possible. Physical security always trumps logical security. By hosting in The Cloud™ you've given up that physical security and are at the mercy of the hosting provider's security measures. The only possible measure you can do would be a boot-time password (essentially moving the security mechanism back to your physical control).


4

To determine your Windows version, pressWin+x and select "System". Your version will be near the top, under "Windows edition". Only 64-bit versions of Windows 8/8.1 Professional and Enterprise support Hyper-V. You also won't be able to enable Hyper-V if your processor's visualization support is not enabled (AMD-V for AMD and VT-x for Intel) As an ...


3

What you're seeing is Windows Product Activation (WPA) detecting the hardware change in the "machine". If the Windows XP license is a retail license you can just use telephone activation to get it re-activated (since a retail full packaged product (FPP) license permits you to reinstall the software on other computers). If you've done this with an OEM ...


3

After troubleshooting this for many hours (and trying all the suggestions posted here), the issue turned out to be the TLS link between our main office and the datacenter. I called our TLS provider and after talking to several NOC technicians, one of them had heard of the exact issue before. It turned out that some of their layer 2 equipment was old and had ...


3

Microsoft provides an MD5 utility, though it is unofficial. It's called "fciv" (File Checksum Integrety Verifier). It can output directly to console or to an XML file depending on what you're doing with it, and even has the ability to recursively dive into a directory if you want to check and entire hierarchy of VHDs. Details here: http://support.microsoft....


3

Sysprep runs in a booted windows environment. No. Click HERE for a thorough sysprep guide. You could convert the vhd to another type like vmdk and try booting the vmdk instead.


3

Yes, there is space overhead and it depends on the type of VHD. For a fixed VHD, there is a 512 byte footer after the raw disk image. For a dynamic VHD, it's only slightly more complicated. The size of the VHD is equal to the size of the actual data written to it plus the size of the header and footer. In your example, your fixed disk VHD would consume (...


3

I know I'm late to the party here but I've found that using SQLIO on Dynamic disks does give false results. The reason behind this is that the tesfile.dat is just a zeroed out file, so the dynamic disk is clever enough to compress this file down behind the scenes, which in turn means it'll fit in your disk cache. So your SQLIO test is essentially just ...


3

Not sure if you are using Windows 7 Virtual PC or Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V or Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V, but I will address each scenario to be safe. If you are using Windows 7, then you will want to mount the precompactor.iso (found in Program Files (x86)\Windows Virtual PC\Integration Components) and run precompact.exe from the mounted ISO. After ...


3

The two strategies are about equally costly. The VHDX part does add a very thin layer, but doing networking from the Hyper-V parent partition in comparison to doing it from the guest will be slightly less expensive, as you're not doing network virtualization for the iSCSI traffic. The VHDX strategy, however, it far easier to manage. Personally, I'd choose ...


3

Measuring time within a VM can be problematic, as the virtual processors don't execute continuously. If you want to get a clear view of what's actually happening, use Performance Monitor in the management OS. Look for Hyper-V Virtual Storage Device. You can correlate that with data from Resource Monitor, too, to see what's contending for access to the ...


3

Remove your snapshots and then expand the disk. You should read up on how snapshots work, because that will explain why expanding the underlying VHD will be bad news for the delta disks.


3

How do you think that would work? The signature would be invalid the moment the appliance changes anything in the file. No, it is not supported.


3

Microsoft Virtual Machine Converter 3.0. It will even upload it to Azure for you.


2

Yes, Hyper-V is "fooling" sqlio with transaction bunching. A Hyper-V Server's SQL VM should not store the DB or Logs in a VHD. You should use a passthrough disk of some kind (iSCSI included). Microsoft has a list of guidelines for SQL on Hyper-V and some details on configuring passthrough disks.


2

This worked for me on Mountain Lion. No installation or compilation necessary: hdiutil attach -readonly -imagekey diskimage-class=CRawDiskImage <Path to .vhd file>


2

ALL VHD files have overhead. A dynamic (growing) one does not however incur substantially more overhead than a preallocated (monolithic) one. The chief difference is that the monolithic/preallocated style has a better chance of being contiguous on disk, which may improve performance. Additionally it avoids the underlying OS calls to expand the file, which ...


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