9

You can use qemu-nbd in Linux to access a disk image as if it were a block device. Here are some examples of operations that can be performed from a live Knoppix terminal. su modprobe nbd qemu-nbd --read-only --connect=/dev/nbd0 --format=vpc <vhd_file_name> If VHDX format: qemu-nbd --connect=/dev/nbd0 --format=VHDX <vhdx_file_name> ...


8

Any block on the virtual disk that you have ever used will count towards your VHD size, deleting files in the filesystem does not free the blocks in the VHD. There is no "TRIM" equivalent mechanism for virtual disk files.


7

The first reason is that maybe your VM's disk has been provisioned as "fixed size" or "thick provision", the variant that allocates the whole amount of disk space prior to formatting. The second variant (which is more likely) is that because formatting a disk in ext4 file system creates FS structures across entire disk, which causes VMware Player to allocate ...


6

I think those settings do not really have any sense if your data disks were initially configured with Read/None cache. This article states it is more a matter of host caching that can be modified through Service Management APIs or Powershell commands.


5

I would suggest going with VM with enabled option "Turn off Windows write-cache buffer flushing on the device" only in the case if you have redundancy on power/UPS or storage system levels. You should consider the data loss in case of power outage or hardware failure if you would enable the option. I can suggest going with S2D, StarWind or HPE VSA as ...


3

I ran into the same issue. Neograph's comment is irrelevant in this case, he's talking about traditional Windows Server disk mirroring, not Storage Spaces. Thin provisioning is also quite irrelevant in this case. You can use it as a workaround, but I think more cautious planning will be better both budget- and performance-wise, just read on and you'll see. ...


3

Recoverability will be strongly influenced by the underlying storage subsystem. Use a VHD file for the VM. There's no performance advantage to passing through the disk itself to the VM and you're way ahead in manageability, flexibility, disaster recovery and backup with the VHD. If you store the VHDs on reliable storage (a file server cluster, a SAN, etc.)...


3

If your infrastructure is so fragile that a power failure can take it out, that's the problem that you should be focusing on. No NAS should be configured as a single point of failure. Nearly all of them come in a version that can be clustered. To answer your question, though, no. Hyper-V will not boot a VM with an invalid configuration, and a missing ...


3

Use HDDGuru Raw Copy Tool Mount the VHD(X) using explorer on Windows 8/10 Plug in the target disk Use the Raw Copy tool to copy the mounted disk to target physical disk This can be used for any of the mountable formats on Windows, iso, vhd, vhdx etc.


2

It is possible to use Virtualbox to attach a physical device as a virtual device inside the VM Windows method VBoxManage internalcommands createrawvmdk -filename "C:\Users\vhudson\VirtualBox VMs\usb.vmdk" -rawdisk \\.\PhysicalDrive1 Linux method VBoxManage internalcommands createrawvmdk -filename usb.vmdk -rawdisk /deb/sdb Using an additional iso as ...


2

It's possible, depending on the version of KVM and CentOS you're using and the filesystem under it. Older versions of KVM had a limit of 2TB, and it took a while to "catch up" after the adoption of GPT volumes. CentOS 5 ext3supports up to 16 TB volumes, so as long as you have reasonably recent version of CentOS, a modern file system and the version of KVM ...


2

If you have a look at the docs for expanding disks in storage spaces it has this warning: Not supported: resizing the underlying storage used by Storage Spaces Direct. If you are running Storage Spaces Direct in a virtualized storage environment, including in Azure, resizing or changing the characteristics of the storage devices used by the virtual ...


2

I agree that you should not mix SSDs and HDDs in the same array (PERC controllers does not even allow it, if I remember correctly). I would create two arrays: an SSD one for OS and caching and an HDD one for raw image storage. I can see two different setups: an lvmthin (HDDs RAID6 or 10) + lvmcache (SSD RAID1) based one, with classical ext4 and/or xfs as ...


2

It is fully up to you according to your requirements in term of storage quantity, performances and redundancy. You can guess that assigning multiple virtual drives to a single VM is possible. The VM see each virtual drive as a different block (like /dev/vda and /dev/vdb). Let's say your VMs should have SSD performance for system boot and programs execution,...


1

Using VDS An application that is using VDS must run under the Backup Operator or Administrators group account. Without the appropriate privilege, an application can create a service loader object, but the object will not load VDS. Instead, it returns an error indicating that access to VDS is denied. So it appears that the application is ...


1

I would do this: Check if there are snapshots taken and, if possible, delete them first Performing a full backup Check the configuration of the VM if there is really only one hard disk configured Download the [machinename].vmx file from the datastore, open it in notepad and check if there is any reference to "CL7_1.vmdk" If there is no reference mount "...


1

Disk Management is simply that, it manages a set of disks and lets you create volumes, be they RAID or not. Storage pools is a completely different method of organising storage. Storage pools can also utilise more disk types than "disk management" allows. This link will give you the lowdown on the RAID aspect (one portion) of storage pools https://blogs....


1

Using disk management and software based RAID doesn't give you the same performance, reliability or flexibility as Storage spaces in Server 2012 and Server 2012 R2. Storage Spaces offer features such as dual parity, Storage tiers, Write-back cache, Enhanced support when use with failover clustering. check out this link:https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/...


1

Hardware RAID is managed at the controller level. You simply can't build a RAID volume using disks from different controllers. A controller can only see and manage disks to which it's actually connected. You could use software RAID, depending on your O.S.; but there's just no way you can handle this at the controller level.


1

Your assumptions are correct. The difference between using a ZVOL and file-backed md(4), from the user point of view, is not that big. Mostly that ZVOL will always be there, and the md disks need to be reattached after reboot. As for growing - both ZVOL and file-backed md disks "grow" automatically, ie are sparse. The geli manual recommends overwriting ...


1

Convert the disk type to a "dynamically expanding" disk. (The more common term, which comes from the VMware world, is thin-provisioned disk). Looks like there's a walk through with screenshots on this Technet blog. And, of course, as a best practice, this is why you have a separate system partition on your servers, and just use it for the operating system ...


1

Azure Disks, stored as VHD in a blob, may only be attached to a Windows Azure virtual machine. If, say, you wanted to build out the disk and then attach to a local Windows machine, you'd need to download the vhd and then attach it through the computer management (or PowerShell). I'm not sure about your app's architecture, but... assuming it's not a legacy ...


1

There is a program called VHD2disk that will do this but as earlier posts mentioned it needs to be run from within windows. I have successfully used HIRENS PE10 which boots a windows 10 environment off flash drive or DVD. I have also successfully cloned and imaged using this approach. The VHD2disk utility unlike DISk2VHD is not produced by sysinternals, ...


1

I have used vmdk2phys to successfully accomplish this. There's another tool called Disk Image Tools or DITOOLS, which purports to do the same. As others have stated, acronis true image can do this. Western Digital has a version of acronis true image that works on any computer with at least one WD hard drive installed called Acronis True Image WD Edition, ...


1

Ok, I see this issue if you try it from non-domain HyperV host --> Creating VM on Domain HyperV host (with using the storage on domain host). Once I tried same steps going from 1 host and using it's own storage creation took seconds. Possible solution: use hyperv manager of that host, where you want to place the VM on.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible