2

As Linksys E4200 stock firmware doesn't support OpenVPN, you probably have DD-WRT. Your issue is not likely caused by the router's configuration, but the specifications of your home Internet. The difference between www.wenxuecity.com [35.190.55.229] and www.google.com [2607:f8b0:4006:811::2004] is not the popularity but the Internet Protocol version used: ...


1

Instead of specifying AllowedIPs = 0.0.0.0/0 specify an ip address. Ran into this question wondering the same thing. The use case detailed here pointed me in the right direction: https://emanuelduss.ch/2018/09/wireguard-vpn-road-warrior-setup/


1

A SSH tunnel only works with TCP, so your VPN server must be configured to use TCP for connections. You connect the the tunnel endpoint on Machine B just as you would connect to Machine A. In other words, just replace the ip address and destination port in your client configuration.


1

The default script interpreter for OpenVPN on Windows is cmd.exe. Modify your client-side script to only include net use Z: "\\server.domain.com\Share" /user:domain\username "P@ssw0rd" or other cmd appropriate commands and you should be good to go. @JasonC also found that the password needed to be quoted. Edit: If you want the end user to type in a ...


1

So, after MUCH more work into this ... I discovered that I indeed could get into the machine (albeit not thru SSH). When I turned off the openvpn, I was able to SSH back in as normal. Suspicion confirmed. Then, the question became: how do I SSH into an OpenVPN client? I found the answer. For anyone else having the issue, I am also putting the solution ...


1

Unfortunately, Windows VPN Client is not capable of changing the target TCP port of VPN connection. I would recommend you to setup a second IP address on your CentOS box and assign different xl2tpd instances to different IP addresses instead of ports. This way you can configure your Windows-based clients to connect to one or another VPN server IP address ...


1

This is completely normal and they should be different subnets. See PfSense OpenVPN RAS documentation. Tunnel Network -- Should be a new, unique network that does not exist anywhere in the current network or routing table. Local Network -- The network here on the server that the clients will need to reach, for example 192.168.1.0/24 If your route (...


1

What kind of VPN are you using? Sounds like your VPN Client should NAT traffic from Linux A to your VPN Server & Linux B. And/or: your Linux B does not have a route back to your VPN Client.


1

I was also in the same boat (using Debian v8.8 and vpnc v5.3r550); all was well with the connect (other than group name now being case sensitive), but once tunneled, I lost all traffic in and out. Then I noted that "sudo route -n" (while tunneled) had "dev tun0" entries for my DNS servers and my larger network (where route command before or after tunneling ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible