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The answer here was my bad pool address allocated. Changing to pools { primary-pool-ipv4 { addrs = 10.0.0.0/24 dns = 8.8.8.8 } primary-pool-ipv6 { addrs = 2620:0:2d0:200::7/97 } } works properly


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Needed PostUp and PostDown lines in wireguard.conf: [Interface] Address = 10.0.0.1/24 SaveConfig = true PostUp = iptables -A FORWARD -i %i -j ACCEPT; iptables -A FORWARD -o %i -j ACCEPT; iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o enp2s0 -j MASQUERADE PostDown = iptables -D FORWARD -i %i -j ACCEPT; iptables -D FORWARD -o %i -j ACCEPT; iptables -t nat -D POSTROUTING -o ...


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If it's an HTTP(S) API, then instead of a NAT router you could consider an HTTP proxy; that could be used in a much more targeted fashion by just the relevant code (only set the proxy to be used in the necessary code paths). If not, then see if you can add routing rules specifically to the relevant pod. Assuming a linux container, use the ip command (you ...


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Michael answered the question, but to answer your questions, you don't need static IP for a VPN, it should work just fine with dynamic as-well, you will just need to change the IP Address in the config in-case (your friend's) IP changes, or your friend will just send new config. Your friend needs open ports, which some ISPs may filter. (Could be possible ...


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This is very easy. Both home server and client must be connected to the same OpenVPN. Once connected to OpenVPN, they can ping each other using the VPN virtual IP addresses. You must allow client-client in OpenVPN server Make sure that home servers are persistently connected to OpenVPN


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Probmel Resolved As @MichaelHampton correctly commented above, a NAT is unnecessary in this scenario. The whole task is solely a matter of correct routing, not NAT-ing. Origin of the problem In order for clients to be able to connect to the LAN (10.20.0.0/24), you must add this subnet to the AllowedIPs directive inside your server config to be allowed. This ...


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It is real, but you need to explain more. In common you have to: Ensure SERVER_CLIENT* have routes to Client* through tunnel Ensure Client* have routes to SERVER_CLIENT* through tunnel If you are the administrator of SERVER-1 and SERVER-2 - there should be no problem. Then: Ensure SERVER-2 have route to Client* via SERVER-1 and vice versa. Here ...


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I believe that @Lacek is right about some configuration issue and Since Open VPN is all about networking and installing it made your VM incaccessible from outside. If you can't connect to your VM you have several options; 1. Easy / convinient one - log into another VM in the same VPC network and then try to login from it to your VM using it's internal IP. If ...


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Let's follow what happens: Client1's routing table tell it that 192.168.64.11 is reachable through wg0. Client1's wg0 cryptokey-routing settings tell that 192.168.64.11 is reachable through 2nd Peer (with a key starting with mRjd9) aka Client2. payload is ready to be tunneled to 2nd Peer's current endpoint... except there's no Endpoint defined to reach the ...


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According to this Heficed's KB article: When you have bought a server with a main IP and assigned additional IPs, additional IPs are routed statically on your main IPs, thus no gateway or broadcast addresses are needed when configuring the IPs on your NIC. server1's main IP address is used to reach other IP addresses, so one can imagine server1's router (...


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AWS have a tentative date for Q1 2021 to release a Linux client, Waiting for that, they suggest to use the Open VPN software with AWS Client VPN AD integration.


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The first thing that stands out to me is the line "ip add v6 10.1.0.4", which suggests an IPv6 address, but contains an IPv4 address. Double check to make sure your Azure VM's NIC has its IPv4 address configured as 10.1.0.4.


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Nebula was released in late 2019 by Slack, and provides a VPN-like mesh overlay network. Tailscale also launched in early 2019, using WireGuard as its data plane. ZeroTier launched in 2015. For something a little more old-school and proprietary: NeoRouter Hamachi


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The other connection is dropping because I think you are using the same IP in both the VPN clients, so when both the VPN clients are connecting they are assigned the same IP address. This is like having two PCs with same IP address in a LAN. To resolve this change the IP in VPN client for each client.


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Any VPN can only protect from eavesdropping between the two endpoints of the VPN, i.e. your computer and the VPN server. The VPN traffic itself is encrypted, (in theory; with ZeroTier you have to trust them) so it doesn't matter if the payload is plaintext. If you make a plaintext HTTP request then it will not be encrypted in any way between the VPN server ...


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Hi i tried a lot of things and the below is what worked for me To connect to cisco anyconnect vpn using commandline from windows: Install anyconnect using the installer In powershell create a file named vpn-cred.dat(any name would do) with following contents connect server-host y username password y Then create a .cmd file with ...


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You'll want the client-to-client option as it has nothing to do with TLS or static keys. --client-to-client Because the OpenVPN server mode handles multiple clients through a single tun or tap interface, it is effectively a router. The --client-to-client flag tells OpenVPN to internally route client-to-client traffic rather than ...


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Turns out, at the time of writing, ECP256 P2S connections are not supported for machine certificate authentication. I've had this confirmed by Microsoft.


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I received the same error and the reason was that the .ovpn, .crt and .key files were moved. To fix this, you have to replace the missing files. For me, this was a simple moving the files back. If this does not help you, then probably creating a new .ovpn file, fixing the paths to the .crt and .key files and creating a new profile in the application works. ...


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Found the answer with this rules: iptables -P FORWARD DROP iptables -A FORWARD -i eth0 -o wg0 -p tcp --syn --dport 3000 -m conntrack --ctstate NEW -j ACCEPT iptables -A FORWARD -i eth0 -o wg0 -m conntrack --ctstate ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT iptables -A FORWARD -i wg0 -o eth0 -m conntrack --ctstate ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT iptables -...


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I suggest you check out Openfortivpn. I had to resort to that, as our implementation of fortigate VPN doesn't have a functioning linux client. OpenfortiVPN works great for me: sudo openfortivpn -c /home/jarmund/vpnconfig my /home/jarmund/vpnconfig: host = vpn.example.com port = 10443 username = my.user@name.com password = sUpErSecReTPasW0Rd trusted-cert = ...


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