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I cannot restrict access to my web server using IP (There are other reasons of this) Security by obscurity never works. Lots of hostile entities constantly scan the internet for (vulnerable) hosts, so even if you don't publish the exact URL or IP address somewhere, it can still be found (and since you are using a public cloud, it will be found). So, ...


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Make sure that you are working on the correct document root path of the website and do a test from another system/proxy URL.


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This is really not recommended. That being said, you could easily handle this using Server Name Indication - its like host headers for encrypted websites. By editing the site bindings you should be able to route https requests for your two additional websites to the appropriate site in IIS based upon the URL; the remainder can be routed to the Exchange-...


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If you have an rfc1918 address (eg 192.168..) nothing in DNS will make that directly accessible from the wider Internet. Using an A record on a public domain could expose that you are running a server, and give an external party hints about your network, but it would not provide a mechanism to allow access to it. You will not be able to use ACME challenges ...


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If you use a private IPv4 address for your Gitlab instance, it will not be visible on the Internet. For example: 192.168.1.125 However, you could set up your Internet router (or whatever it is used for) to allow external access, so you should make sure it is not set up accidentally. You then have to take care of the domain and name resolution within your ...


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When you have control over the clients that will connect to your servers, one appropriate solution would be to set up a self-signed internal certificate authority. What you would do in theory is to set up a root certificate which should be kept secure and offline. Based on this one you would create child CA certificates that should be used to sign the ...


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This seems not to be a security issue. Please have a look at this answer: https://stackoverflow.com/a/28010608/9361998 As a workaround (if you want to stop these request) you can ban the ip address with the following script NOTE: Be sure to run as root The theory is very simple: Read the nginx and filter the ssl handshake error Create a python script ...


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Your domain tamamsouq.com have a DNSSEC related problem, which you can see if you go at http://dnsviz.net/d/tamamsouq.com/dnssec/ This is the first problem to address. In summary, you put a DS record at the parent zone but your nameservers do not publish any related DNSKEY record. This will make your domain as failed for any recursive nameserver checking ...


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Took a few minutes to work this out - the problem is a typo. The nameservers are ns1.checkerinc.net and ns2.checkersinc.net - however you put dns1.checkersinc.net and dns2.checkersinc.net. While the latter domains exist, they do not appear to be authorative servers. The solution is to log into your registrar and update the DNS records. to remove the "d" ...


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