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13

Using built in tools on Windows you have a few options. Use the regedit GUI. Microsoft regedit provides import and export [export visible in your screenshot] options. When you export a key, it will appear in a .REG file. This is an example. example.reg Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Example] [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\...


12

HKLM\System - %windir%\system32\config\SYSTEM HKLM\Software - %windir%\system32\config\SOFTWARE HKLM\Security - %windir%\system32\config\SECURITY HKLM\Sam - %windir%\system32\config\SAM HKEY_USERS.DEFAULT - %windir%\system32\config\Default HKEY_USERS\[SID] - %userprofile%\Ntuser.dat HKCU\[SID]\Software\Classes - %userprofile%\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\...


11

Copy IE proxy settings to WinHttp: Run cmd as administrator: netsh winhttp show proxy netsh winhttp import proxy source =ie


10

Passwords for Windows services are stored in the registry under: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SECURITY\Policy\Secrets\_SC_<ServiceName> When you configure a Windows service to run as a different account, the Service Control Manager uses the LsaStorePrivateData function to store the password, and the corresponding LsaRetrievePrivateData function to retrieve it. ...


8

Yes; from the Group Policy Object Editor, expand Computer Configuration > Windows Settings > Security Settings. You should see a Registry option, where you can add keys and specify permissions. Note that just allows you to play with permissions; i.e. this is different from Group Policy Preferences, where you can actually set values


8

They're not backups of registry changes, actually, they're what changes to the registry are before they become changes to the registry. A type of .tmp file for registry changes, in essence. As a protection against registry corruption, which used to be a fairly common, and very nasty problem in Windows, what newer versions of Windows do when a change to the ...


8

Your conception is incorrect. ADM/ADMX files are nothing like exports from the registry. Administrative Templates (both the old-style ADM and newer-style ADMX files) exist to drive the user interface in the Group Policy editor. They define the settings that can be managed, not the settings themselves. These settings amount to registry values which are ...


7

There is no built-in feature in Windows Server 2003 GPOs to configure custom Registry keys. You can either use a startup/logon script to import a .REG file, or create a custom administrative template which will act on the keys you need to modify.


7

There is an excellent rundown of how to do it in PowerShell here. Essentially, you can use Get-Acl and Set-Acl in PowerShell like you would for any other path. $acl = Get-Acl HKLM:\SOFTWARE\stuff $rule = New-Object System.Security.AccessControl.RegistryAccessRule ("Domain\user","FullControl","Allow") $acl.SetAccessRule($rule) $acl |Set-Acl -Path HKLM:\...


7

What about Reg Delete HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\CurrentVersion\SampleKey ? Type reg Delete /? for more info


7

I'd like to preface this by saying that I strongly urge anyone that disables their Windows firewall to take the time to understand how it works and how to manipulate it via GPO instead of outright turning it off. There's no reason to turn off a host-based firewall. Microsoft makes excellent tools to manage firewall rules, you should use them. This TechNet ...


6

%CD% will get you your current working directory, and you may be able to use the "Reg" command rather than a .reg fragment: http://www.petri.co.il/reg_command_in_windows_xp.htm So, maybe something like the following would work for you. Just create a .bat file with the following contents: REG ADD HKLM\System\CUrrentControlSet\Services\SeleniumRC\Parameters ...


6

Another way, albeit much messier, is to use psexec to open a command prompt running as LOCAL SYSTEM, then from that open iexplore.exe, modify the settings appropriately.


6

The reason you're unable to copy that file is not a permission issue, or Windows being "protective" about the file; the problem is, that file is always in use (and therefore locked) on a running system. When loaded, the file is mapped to HKLM\System; you can use reg.exe to export its contents, both in text and binary format: reg export HKLM\System system....


6

Errr, tidy up your GPOs, and disable it there. Or, at the very least, create a new GPO at the top of the stack (highest precedence) and disable the firewall. Then go back and tidy your other GPOs later. Local Security policy gets overridden by GPOs, and the first area of the registry you're writing to is specifically for GPO processing. Short answer... ...


6

This registry snippet should alleviate all that, run it from Powershell (as admin) and when you right click This PC 'Manage' it will open compmgmt.msc directly. Works instantly. Enable - Manage via CompMgmt.msc Set-ItemProperty -Path 'registry::HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\clsid\{20D04FE0-3AEA-1069-A2D8-08002B30309D}\shell\Manage\command' -Name "(default)" -Value "...


6

Your understanding is correct. When your company gets to the size that you need to bring in a dedicated Windows sysadmin they're going to be unhappy that you did this. I can't imagine that your logic is so complex that it couldn't be solved by the built-in functionality in Group Policy. Security Group filtering, WMI filtering (which is performance-...


6

In 64-bit Windows, there exists what are called file system and registry redirection. These exist for compatibility with older applications that were written for 32-bit Windows and for applications designed for older versions of Windows. WoW64 hooks all system calls made by 32-bit processes, such that if my 32-bit application running on a 64-bit version of ...


6

.admx files are written in XML and contain settings that the Group Policy Management Console can read. Group Policy then translates those settings to registry keys (which may not exist prior to the policy being applied). Windows update settings live in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate. When I worked in a setting without ...


6

Yes, you should disable SSLv3 in favour of TLSv1.1+. SSLv3 & TLS1.0 are considered vulnerable to the "Padding Oracle On Downgraded Legacy Encryption" man-in-the-middle attack, which may lead to revealing your secret data (such as passwords) to an attacker...


5

Two options for a permanent fix: Have the group that manages your domain's group policies put you into an exception OU that doesn't enforce the legal notice. Remove the laptop from the domain.


5

Update: Microsoft has published KB 2751647 which describes the necessary settings: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2751647 For these scenarios, I usually just take a before/after snapshot using reg. REG EXPORT HKLM HKLM-Before.txt REG EXPORT HKCU HKCU-Before.txt Make the configuration setting changes... REG EXPORT HKLM HKLM-After.txt REG ...


5

The best thing to do is to think about what the values mean, and then tune them appropriately. If you haven't already read the RIPE-203 document you cited, you should do so, since it explains each of the records and why RIPE chose particular values: 4.4. The Refresh and Retry Values The refresh and retry values primarily affect the zone maintainer ...


5

According to this TechNet article it appear that the key for the policy in question is HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa\TurnOffAnonymousBlock I can't think of any GPO settings that don't push down registry keys, so you can simply do something like: reg query HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa\...


5

Guessing the registry keys would be created here. You don't have to guess. Le Microsoft KB: [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\Schannel] "EventLogging"=dword:00000001 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SecurityProviders\Schannel\Ciphers] [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\...


4

Warning: I do not recommend doing this! But since you asked... Foreach($p In Get-Process) { $Handles = \\live.sysinternals.com\Tools\handle.exe -p $p.ProcessName -a ForEach($h In $Handles) { If($h.Contains(": Key")) { \\live.sysinternals.com\Tools\handle.exe -c $h.Split(':')[0].Trim() -p $p.Id } } } ...


4

reg add "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Setup" /v SourcePath /t REG_SZ /d "X:\\" Add /f if you want to skip prompting for a possible overwrite.


4

I believe the solution to the first problem is to have the scheduled task run as SYSTEM. Is that correct? Generally you should only run something as SYSTEM if it actually needs that absolute level of privileges. A much better choice might be to setup a service account just for this task. Then you may want to disable password expiration for the account, or ...


4

I believe the group policy you want is User Configuration\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Internet Explorer\Compatibility View\ intranetcompatabilitymode set to disabled


4

You need to talk to whoever is in charge of the Active Directory domain. They have the legal notice set via Group Policy; it will always come back.


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